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What we look for in a s22 PoCA 2002 statement

Prosecution applications under s22 to require a further payment from the convicted defendant are becoming more and more common.

A financial investigator or officer will normally file a s22 witness statement in support of the application. What do we look for in that s22 statement?

The prosecutor’s s22 statement

Rule 33.16 of the Criminal Procedure Rules 2015 addresses such an application.  This simply says that the application must be in writing and may be supported by a witness statement.  But the Rule does not prescribe the content of that statement.

I would suggest that it would be best practice for the statement to:

  • Include an explanation of the history of the case, the current financial investigation and its findings, and the prosecutor’s proposals for variation of the confiscation order, and
  • Take the court through the steps required under s22 to vary the order.

Hopefully the author of the s22 statement will demonstrate a good understanding of the legislation, the difference between the concepts of the “available amount” and the “amount required to be paid”, and the impact of changes in the value of money on the figures.

Ideally appended to the s22 statement should be copies of:

  • The original s16 statement(s)
  • The original confiscation order and supporting schedule 5050A of available amount, and any later variations to these
  • The new evidence relied on, such as bank statements or Land Registry documents and property valuations
  • Numerical schedules in support of the figures in the s22 statement,
  • A copy of any current restraint order, and
  • A draft of the proposed court order varying the confiscation order.

The author of the s22 statement will have had the opportunity to collect information using the investigation powers of Part 8 PoCA 2002 and under information request clauses in any restraint order which has been obtained as a precursor to the s22 application.  Since the prosecution are making the application it does not seem unreasonable to me to ask that they present the evidence required to support it.

Poor quality s22 statements

However in my experience s22 statements are of poor quality, fail to take the court through the necessary steps to vary the order and confuse the defendant’s “available amount” (which depends only upon the assets he has today, liabilities secured on those assets, and any ‘tainted gifts’ he has made in the past) with the “amount required to be paid” (which is the total of the amount(s) previously required to be paid and the additional amount to be required to be paid under the proposed variation).

Where a s22 variation is proposed the prosecutor is requesting an increased “amount required to be paid” – which will in most cases be in excess of the defendant’s “available amount”.

Angela, Bernard and Cyril

Some worked examples will make the position clearer.

Consider Angela, Bernard and Cyril.  Let’s assume (to make life easier) that, although there is no connection between them, each of them has suffered a very similar fate.  So in each case:

  • They have been convicted of possession of controlled drugs with intent to supply, a ‘criminal lifestyle’ offence
  • Each of them was charged on 15 August 2007, convicted on 27 November 2008, and made subject to a confiscation order on 21 April 2009
  • On 21 April 2009 each of them was found to have a benefit of £400,000 and an available amount of £100,000, and was the subject of a confiscation order made that day requiring payment of £100,000
  • None of them had any benefit jointly obtained with another person
  • Each of them paid £100,000 on 7 October 2009
  • There have been no variations to the confiscation orders since 21 April 2009 and no other confiscation proceedings against them
  • A s22 application is being made now (July 2019)
  • The latest published CPIH figure is that for May 2019.

But each of them now is in a different financial position:

  • Angela’s mother died and has left her £500,000 which she has in a bank account.  She has no other assets and no secured liabilities
  • Bernard owns a mortgaged property in which there is £120,000 of equity and has £30,000 in the bank.  He has no other assets or secured liabilities
  • Cyril has £70,000 in a bank account.  He has no other assets and no secured liabilities
  • None of them have made any ‘tainted gifts’ since 16 August 2001 (the ‘relevant day’).

What applications under s22 should the prosecution make in each case?

Let us assume that the prosecutor considers it would be “just” for the court to increase the amount required to be paid to the maximum amount possible under s22 in the circumstances.

We know from the Office for National Statistics that the CPIH stood at 87.5 in April 2009, 88.4 in October 2009 and 107.9 in May 2019 (the most recent figure we have).

Angela’s s22 variation

Angela’s available amount is £500,000.  That is the result of the ‘new calculation’ under s22(3).

Her available amount in April 2009 was £100,000, that is the ‘relevant amount’ for s22(8).  If we uplift that for CPIH changes since April 2009, in accordance with s22(7), that becomes £123,314.28.

Clearly £500,000 exceeds £123,314.28 so the ‘trigger’ condition of s22(4) is satisfied and the court can vary the order.

The total benefit was £400,000 in April 2009.  Using CPIH we uplift that to an equivalent of £493,257.14.  That is the maximum amount that can be required to be paid under s22(4)(b).

Assuming the court varies the order so that £493,257.14 becomes “the amount required to be paid”, of which Angela paid £100,000 in October 2009, she could be required to pay a further £393,257.14.

However the court may consider it “just” to uplift the £100,000 paid by Angela in October 2009 using CPIH, which gives £122,058.82.

This would mean that the court order would be that the amount required to be paid is £493,257.14 of which Angela has in effect paid £122,058.82, meaning she would be required to pay a further £371,198.32.

Bernard’s s22 variation

Bernard’s available amount is £150,000.  That is the result of the ‘new calculation’ under s22(3).

Clearly £150,000 exceeds £123,314.28 so the ‘trigger’ condition of s22(4) is satisfied and the court can vary the order.

The prosecutor will ask the the court to vary the order so that £250,000 becomes the “amount required to be paid”, of which Bernard paid £100,000 in October 2009  so, if the court agrees, he would be required to pay a further £150,000.

The £250,000 required to be paid is clearly less than Bernard’s total benefit for the purposes of s22(4)(b) – or more precisely,  £272,058.82 does not exceed £493,257.14  – so there is no s22(4)(b) bar to requiring Bernard to pay a further £150,000.

Cyril’s s22 variation

Cyril’s available amount is £70,000.  That is the result of the ‘new calculation’ under s22(3).

Clearly £70,000 does not exceed £123,314.28 so the ‘trigger’ condition of s22(4) is not satisfied and the court cannot vary the confiscation order under s22 in Cyril’s case.

(In practice many prosecutors would apply to the court for a variation in a case such as Cyril’s.  As far as I am aware there is no binding legal precedent yet on a situation such as this.)

Key mistakes made by prosecutors

In my experience the key mistakes made by prosecutors in preparing s22 statements are:

  • Failing to give proper consideration to the detailed provisions of s22
  • Failing to consider the impact of the changing value of money
  • Misdescribing the “amount required to be paid” as the “available amount”, and
  • Failing to append relevant documents and schedules to the s22 statement.

In consequence the prosecution can fail to assist the court to apply the correct test and come to a proper conclusion.

It then falls to the defence legal team, assisted where appropriate by forensic accountants such as ourselves, to provide the court with the information it needs under section 22.

Of course the defence legal team will also seek to persuade the court that it would not be “just” to vary the confiscation order in accordance with the prosecutor’s application – but that’s a subject for another time!

Contacting us

Our contact details are here.

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales. There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this. Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

Challenging a s22 PoCA 2002 confiscation reconsideration

Crown Court judgeThe revisiting of old confiscation orders by prosecutors under section 22 Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 is becoming more frequent.

This blog post considers the provisions of s22 and ways in which prosecution applications under s22 may be challenged by the defendant.

Section 22 is headed “Order made: reconsideration of available amount”.

WARNING – THIS IS A LENGTHY BLOG POST – APPROXIMATELY 3,000 WORDS

  1. Reconsideration of available amount
  2. The legal ‘trigger’
  3. “Makes” v “varies”
  4. Inflation
  5. The burden of proof
  6. What is ‘just’?
  7. The prosecutor’s s22 application and witness statement
  8. Restraint orders and investigation powers
  9. Time limit
  10. Challenges
  11. Default sentence
  12. Due date for payment & interest
  13. Second revisit
  14. Appeals
  15. Conclusion
  16. Contacting us

 

Reconsideration of available amount

Section 22 PoCA 2002 empowers the Crown Court to vary an existing confiscation order made under s6 of the Act.  In effect it allows the prosecution to apply to the court for a further payment to be required from the defendant under an existing confiscation order where his available amount has increased since the original order was made.

This blog article does not consider variations to confiscation orders made under earlier legislation, such as the Criminal Justice Act 1988, Drug Trafficking Act 1994 or Drug Trafficking Offences Act 1986.  Different rules apply under those Acts.

Nor are we considering the position of a person who has a new conviction and a new confiscation order is being made as a result of that.

We are considering the situation of a defendant who was made subject to a confiscation order, perhaps some years ago, at which time the court ruled that he had a figure of benefit which was higher than his available amount.  At that time the court would not have ordered him to pay the full amount of his benefit.  Instead the amount he was then ordered to pay would have been restricted to his available amount at that time.  The figures of the defendant’s benefit, available amount and the amount he was ordered to pay should all be spelled out in the original confiscation order.

Under s22 the prosecutor asks the court to consider the available amount which the defendant has now and to order him to pay a further amount now towards his total benefit.

Let’s consider Jim’s case.  Jim was subject to a confiscation order in September 2008.  That order says that Jim’s benefit was £100,000 and his available amount was £500.  Jim was ordered to pay £500 which he has paid.  Today Jim owns a house with his wife.  The house is worth £200,000 but there is a mortgage of £180,000.  So Jim’s half share is worth £10,000.  Jim also has a car worth £6,000 but no other assets, so Jim’s total available amount today is £16,000.

The prosecution can ask the court under s22 to order Jim to pay a further £16,000 (or some other figure) by making a variation to the confiscation order made in September 2008, requiring a further payment now.

 

The legal ‘trigger’

The legal ‘trigger’ for a s22 variation is in subsection 22(4):-

If the amount found under the new calculation exceeds the relevant amount the court may vary the order by substituting for the amount required to be paid such amount as –

(a) it believes is just, but

(b) does not exceed the amount found as the defendant’s benefit from the conduct concerned“.

The ‘trigger’ is in the first phrase – “If the amount found under the new calculation exceeds the relevant amount“.  What that means is that a s22 variation can only be made where the defendant’s available amount now exceeds the available amount shown on the original confiscation order.

In Jim’s case it obviously does (£16,000 is more than £500) and so the court can consider making an order requiring a further payment from Jim now.

 

“Makes” v “varies”

Under s22 a court may “vary” an existing confiscation order – but it does not “make” a confiscation order.  The legislation does not regard a variation to amount to the ‘making’ of an order.  This can be seen most clearly in the differing provisions regarding default sentence when a court “makes” an order – see s35 – and when a court “varies” an order – see s39.

It follows that an order which has been varied under s22 is an order which was ‘made’ at the time of the original confiscation hearing, not at the time of the variation.

 

Inflation

In these cases we can be looking back at figures determined by the court some years ago.  Because of this s22 recognises the effect of inflation by subsection 22(7) which says:-

In deciding under this section whether one amount exceeds another the court must take account of any change in the value of money.

This is done by using the RPIJ index published by the Office for National Statistics.  [UPDATE: Since the article was written courts have moved on to using CPIH rather than RPIJ for ‘inflation’ uplifts.]

In Jim’s case the confiscation order was made in September 2008 when RPIJ stood at 209.8.  The latest figure (May 2016) is 240.1.

So uplifting Jim’s benefit of £100,000 it becomes equivalent to £114,442 and his original available amount of £500 becomes equivalent to £572 today.

So, strictly speaking, the trigger condition is whether £16,000 exceeds £572 – which of course it does.

The prosecutor will most likely ask the court to vary the original confiscation order so that Jim’s amount to pay is £16,500 – that is the £500 which he has already paid plus a further £16,000 payable now.

The prosecutor will point out that this amount (which when adjusted for changes in the value of money is equivalent to £16,572) is less than Jim’s total benefit (which when adjusted for changes in the value of money is £114,442).

 

The burden of proof

An application under s22 is made by the prosecutor (or an enforcement receiver appointed under s50).  It would appear that the burden of proof is on the applicant to provide information enabling the court to make a “new calculation” of the defendant’s available amount.

This contrasts with the position when the confiscation order was originally made (at which time the burden was on the defendant to show that his available amount was less than his benefit, by virtue of s7).

 

What is ‘just’?

Under s22(4) the court is to vary the amount to be paid to an amount which the court “believes is just.”  What does that mean?

What is ‘just’ does not only mean what is ‘just’ for the defendant.  The concept has regard to the legitimate interests of both sides.

I suggest that part of the process of deciding what is ‘just’ involves looking back at the figure of benefit previously decided by the court and considering whether that figure, in the light of subsequent legal developments, is either faulty because it was based on a misunderstanding of the law (as may have arisen, for example, in a case of mortgage fraud), or is an amount which it would now be considered disproportionate to order the defendant to pay in full (as may be the case, for example, where stolen property has been returned to its owner).

That will involve some detailed reconsideration of the basis on which the original confiscation order was made, which may involve re-examination of the basis of prosecution’s assertions regarding benefit which were set out in the original s16 statement insofar as the court accepted those assertions when making the confiscation order.

Where, in the light of the relevant law as it is understood today, the defendant would not now be ordered to pay an amount based on the whole of the benefit shown in the original confiscation order then, I suggest, it would not be ‘just’ to order a defendant to pay that amount now under s22.

So it is necessary, in my view, to consider the impact of case law such as R v Waya [2012] UKSC 51 (proportionality and confiscation, mortgage fraud), R v Ahmad [2014] UKSC 36  (recovery from co-defendants), R v Harvey [2015] UKSC 73 (VAT and confiscation) and Boyle Transport (Northern Ireland) Ltd v R [2016] EWCA Crim 19 (piercing the corporate veil) on the understanding of confiscation law, when considering an application under s22.

This does not mean that the defendant is appealing against the benefit figure in the original confiscation order.  He is asking the court to consider what it would be ‘just’ for him to be ordered to pay now under s22.

[UPDATE: The case of R v Cole [2018] EWCA Crim 888 (24 April 2018) in the Court of Appeal concerned a s22 application in a mortgage fraud case. The original confiscation order had been made before the Supreme Court decision in Waya and the benefit included the amount of the mortgage advance.  The Court of Appeal restricted the further amount ordered to be paid under s22 in line with what the original benefit figure would have been had a ‘Waya-compliant’ approach been followed when the confiscation order was first made.  In other words the Court of Appeal did take into account the decision in Waya when making the s22 variation.]

More broadly the court appears to have a discretion under s22 to consider what amount, in all the circumstances, it believes it would be ‘just’ for the defendant to be ordered to pay.

The Court of Appeal has held in the case of Padda v R [2013] EWCA Crim 2330, “In that context, it is entirely appropriate for a court to consider such matters as the amount outstanding, the additional amount which might now be available for a further payment, the length of time since the original confiscation order was made, the impact on the Defendant of any further payment contemplated and indeed any other consideration which might properly be thought to affect the justice of the case.

When the court is considering a variation to a confiscation order under s22 then – once the trigger condition has been satisfied – the court may order the defendant to pay a further amount of any size, large or small, so long as the total which the defendant is required to pay under the confiscation order (adjusted for changes in the value of money) does not exceed the total of his benefit (adjusted for changes in the value of money).

Strictly speaking, the only relevance of the defendant’s current available amount is in relation to determining whether the trigger condition is satisfied.  In practice however the prosecutor is likely to suggest that it would be just for the defendant to be ordered to pay an additional amount which is the lesser of (a) his current available amount, and (b) the maximum which the defendant could be ordered to pay in relation to his total benefit.

 

The prosecutor’s s22 application and witness statement

Section 22 does not make express provision for a prosecutor’s statement in support of an application for a variation of a confiscation order.  There are no express provisions akin to those found in s16.

Equally there are no express provisions akin to sections 17, 18 and 18A requiring statements or information from the defendant or third parties.

Nevertheless the prosecutor (or enforcement receiver) will need to make a written application to the court and the likelihood is that he will append to that a witness statement which will be in some respects similar to a s16 statement.  Rule 33.16 Criminal Procedure Rules 2015 applies to the service of the application and any supporting witness statement.  It is likely that the defendant will want to respond to the application by way of a statement of his own before the court hearing.

 

Restraint orders and investigation powers

The prosecutor is entitled to apply for a restraint order, under s40(6), when a s22 application is to be made or has been made.

Where the court makes a restraint order it may also require the subject of the restraint order to supply information under s41(7) for the purpose of ensuring that the restraint order is effective.

However it appears that the investigation powers under Part 8 of PoCA 2002 are not available to a prosecutor applying for a s22 variation, because a s22 application does not appear to involve a ‘confiscation investigation’ as defined by s341(1).

There could be some debate as to whether a s22 investigation is an investigation into “the extent or whereabouts of realisable property available for satisfying a confiscation order made” in respect of the defendant, referred to in s341(1)(c).  My own view is that “satisfying a confiscation order made” refers to full payment of the amount ordered to be paid under the original confiscation order which has been made, rather than referring to satisfying a variation of that confiscation order which is (perhaps) to be made.  If that is the case, and if the original confiscation order has been paid in full, then the s22 investigation would, in my view at least, not fall within s341(1) with the result that the Part 8 investigation powers would not be available to a financial investigator acting for the prosecutor.

[UPDATE: The Criminal Finances Act 2017 includes – at section 33 – an amendment to s341(1)(c) intended to make the investigation powers of Part 8 available to a prosecutor applying for a s22 variation.  This came into force on 31 January 2018.]

 

Time limit

There is no statutory time limit.  This means that a s22 application may be made many years after the original confiscation order was made.

 

Challenges

A s22 application may be subject to a variety of challenges by the defendant.

The defendant may assert that the trigger condition has not been satisfied.  Take the example of Bert who was subject to a confiscation order made in February 2012.  In that order his benefit was held to be £90,000 and his available amount was £40,000.  Bert was ordered to pay £40,000 which he has paid.  The prosecutor now finds that Bert has £25,000 in a bank account in his sole name.  Bert has no other assets, so his available amount now is £25,000.

The RPIJ in February 2012 was 225.8.  The latest figure (May 2016) is 240.1.

So uplifting Bert’s benefit of £90,000 it becomes equivalent to £95,699 and his original available amount of £40,000 becomes equivalent to £42,533 today.

So, strictly speaking the trigger condition is whether £25,000 exceeds £42,533 – which of course it does not.

It follows that the trigger condition is not satisfied and the court should not order Bert to pay a further amount now under s22.

A second area of challenge concerns the defendant’s available amount.  Consider Charles who, according to Land Registry records, is the sole legal owner of Rose Cottage.  The prosecutor values Rose Cottage at £250,000.  There is an outstanding mortgage of £150,000.  The prosecutor therefore asserts that Charles has an available amount of £100,000.

Charles may challenge this on the basis that he is not the sole beneficial owner of Rose Cottage and that the current value of Rose Cottage is less than £250,000.  That challenge may have a bearing on whether the trigger condition is satisfied and on the value of Charles’ current available amount – with obvious implications for any amount which Charles may be ordered to pay now as a result of the s22 application.

A third area of challenge concerns what might loosely be described as ‘change of law’.  In 2005 Peter was convicted of mortgage fraud in that he had purchased a house with a mortgage of £100,000 which he had obtained by giving false information on his mortgage application.  Peter was subject to confiscation with a benefit of £100,000 (the amount of the mortgage advance) and an available amount of £20,000.  He was ordered to pay £20,000 which he has paid.  Peter now has £50,000 in a bank account in his sole name but no other assets (so his available amount is £50,000).  He is subject to a s22 application.

Peter may challenge the application on the basis that it would not be ‘just’ to order him to pay £50,000 under s22 as, on a proper and just interpretation of the legal position, he did not ‘obtain’ the mortgage advance and, in any event, the mortgage advance has since been fully repaid to the lender.

The court would then have to consider what further sum, if any, it would be ‘just’ to order Peter to pay under the confiscation order.  That may involve consideration of the price for which Peter ultimately sold the mortgaged property.

A fourth possible area of challenge concerns prosecution delay and Article 6(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights.  Consider the case of Derek who was subject to a confiscation order in 2006.  The court then found he had a benefit of £175,000 and an available amount of £25,000.  He was ordered to pay £25,000 which he has paid.  In 2011 the prosecution discovered that Derek was the sole owner of a property worth £200,000 which he had inherited from his father who died in 2009.  No action was taken by the prosecution at the time.  The file was reviewed in 2016 and an application was then made under s22.

Derek may challenge the application on the basis that it infringes his Article 6(1) rights in that the prosecutor has not brought the s22 application to court “within a reasonable time”.

Fifthly, a s22 application may be challenged on the basis that, taking everything into consideration, it would be simply unjust to order the defendant to make any further payment now – or that it would be unjust to require him to pay the full amount requested by the prosecution.  It might be argued, for example, that it would be just for the defendant to be ordered an amount based on his bank balance but not any part of the value of the equity in his home or the value of assets he uses in his legitimate business.  However such an argument would have to overcome the clear legislative policy in favour of maximising the recovery of the proceeds of crime, even from legitimately acquired assets.

There may be other bases on which a s22 application may be challenged.

 

Default sentence

The provisions of s22 permit the court to vary the amount to be paid under the confiscation order, but do not expressly authorise the court to vary the original default sentence (which will have been based on the original amount payable).

Section 35 authorises the court to set a default sentence when it “makes a confiscation order”, not when it varies one.  However s39 authorises the court to vary the default sentences in the circumstances detailed in that section.

One of the trigger conditions in s39 is that a confiscation order has been varied under s22 and the effect of the variation is to vary the maximum period of a default sentence applicable in relation to the order under s139(4) Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000.

Unfortunately when s35 was amended by s10 Serious Crime Act 2015 corresponding amendments to s39 were not made.  The effect appears to be that the court can vary the default term in accordance with the table of default terms in certain circumstances, but only in accordance with the default terms set out in s139(4) Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000.  These are the default terms which applied to confiscation orders made before 1 June 2015.

In other words, when considering a default term in the context of a s22 variation it is as if the changes to default sentences made by the Serious Crime Act 2015 had never happened.

 

Due date for payment & interest

Strictly speaking, s22 does not authorise the court to vary the due date for payment.  Under s11 this is closely tied to the date on which the confiscation order is “made” (not the date on which it is varied under s22).  Under s12 the defendant must pay interest on any amount which is not paid when it is required to be paid.

However it would appear to be a nonsense to charge interest, backdated to the date on which the confiscation order was originally made, on an additional amount.  Such an interest charge might be considered to infringe the defendant’s rights under Article 1 of the First Protocol of the European Convention on Human Rights.

 

Second revisit

After a confiscation order has been varied under s22 is it possible to revisit it again at a later date?  The short answer is ‘Yes’.

However on a subsequent revisit the ‘trigger’ condition will be interpreted as comparing the defendant’s current available amount with his available amount as determined on the most recent occasion on which an application was made under s22.

 

Appeals

It seems clear that a defendant can appeal against a s22 variation where he considers the variation to have been wrong in principle or manifestly excessive (see Padda referred to above).

On the other hand, it does not appear that a prosecutor is able to appeal against the amount by which the court decides to vary a confiscation order on a s22 application, or a decision not to make any variation – but he is able to make a fresh application under s22 at a later date.

[UPDATE: In the case of R v Mundy [2018] EWCA Crim 105 the Court of Appeal did grant the prosecution leave to appeal a Crown Court decision not to vary a confiscation order under s22.  The basis for that leave to appeal appears to have been s31(1) PoCA 2002 which refers to an appeal where the Crown Court “makes” a confiscation order.  Since the s22 application was a request to “vary” rather than to “make” a confiscation order, it is open to debate whether the prosecution’s appeal was validly made.  In any event the Court of Appeal dismissed the prosecution’s appeal.]

 

Conclusion

There are a number of matters which will need to be carefully considered by prosecution and defence in connection with a prosecutor’s application under s22 for reconsideration of a defendant’s available amount.

 

Contacting us

Our contact details are here.

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales.  Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

Balance of probabilities in confiscation

balance-scalesIn confiscation law ‘the balance of probabilities’ plays a key role.  Under s6(7) Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 the court must decide any question relevant to the determination of the amount which the defendant is to be ordered to pay on the balance of probabilities.

But what does that mean?

 

The balance of probabilities

Some years ago the House of Lords (as the UK Supreme Court was known at the time) considered the meaning of the phrase ‘the balance of probabilities’ in the case of Re H & Others (minors) [1995] UKHL 16.  The case actually concerned an application by a local authority for a care order under the Children Act 1989 in respect of certain children who may or may not have become subject to significant harm if they remained in the care of their mother and step-father.

Nevertheless I suggest that the House of Lords’ comments in that case on the meaning of the expression ‘the balance of probabilities’ are of wider application.  Indeed when s6(7) of the then Proceeds of Crime Bill was being considered by a committee of MPs they were referred by the government minister to this judgment.

The House of Lords’ judgment includes the following:-

“The balance of probability standard means that a court is satisfied an event occurred if the court considers that, on the evidence, the occurrence of the event was more likely than not. When assessing the probabilities the court will have in mind as a factor, to whatever extent is appropriate in the particular case, that the more serious the allegation the less likely it is that the event occurred and, hence, the stronger should be the evidence before the court concludes that the allegation is established on the balance of probability. Fraud is usually less likely than negligence. Deliberate physical injury is usually less likely than accidental physical injury.  . . .  Built into the preponderance of probability standard is a generous degree of flexibility in respect of the seriousness of the allegation.”

“Although the result is much the same, this does not mean that where a serious allegation is in issue the standard of proof required is higher. It means only that the inherent probability or improbability of an event is itself a matter to be taken into account when weighing the probabilities and deciding whether, on balance, the event occurred. The more improbable the event, the stronger must be the evidence that it did occur before, on the balance of probability, its occurrence will be established.”

In the later case of Re B (Children) [2008] UKHL 35, the House of Lords commented on this passage, stressing the importance of the words “to whatever extent is appropriate in the particular case“.  The judgment went on:-

“There is only one rule of law, namely that the occurrence of the fact in issue must be proved to have been more probable than not. Common sense, not law, requires that in deciding this question, regard should be had, to whatever extent appropriate, to inherent probabilities.”

In another House of Lords case in 2008, Re CD (Northern Ireland) [2008] UKHL 33 Lord Carswell said, at para [28]:-

“A possible source of confusion is the failure to bear in mind with sufficient clarity the fact that in some contexts a court or tribunal has to look at the facts more critically or more anxiously than in others before it can be satisfied to the requisite standard.  The standard itself is, however, finite and unvarying.  Situations which make such heightened examination necessary may be the inherent unlikelihood of the occurrence taking place (Lord Hoffmann’s example of the animal seen in Regent’s Park [which may have been a lioness or an Alsatian]), the seriousness of the allegation to be proved or, in some cases, the consequences which could follow from acceptance of proof of the relevant fact.  The seriousness of the allegation requires no elaboration: a tribunal of fact will look closely into the facts grounding an allegation of fraud before accepting that it has been established.  The seriousness of consequences is another facet of the same proposition: if it is alleged that a bank manager has committed a minor peculation, that could entail very serious consequences for his career, so making it the less likely that he would risk doing such a thing.  These are all matters of ordinary experience, requiring the application of good sense on the part of those who have to decide such issues.  They do not require a different standard of proof or a specially cogent standard of evidence, merely appropriately careful consideration by the tribunal before it is satisfied of the matter which has to be established.”

In a further case, Re S-B Children [2009] UKSC 17, Lady Hale in the Supreme Court said:-

“There is no necessary connection between the seriousness of an allegation and the improbability that it has taken place. The test is the balance of probabilities, nothing more and nothing less.”

So it is the inherent improbability of an event, not its seriousness, which as a matter of common sense will be in the mind of the court when deciding an issue on the balance of probabilities.

 

Confiscation proceedings

In confiscation proceedings the court will be dealing with a defendant who has been convicted of an offence.  The existence of that conviction, and the evidence already accepted by the court in relation to it, cannot be ignored by the court when drawing conclusions relevant to the confiscation order.

However I suggest the court should not lose sight of the significance of ‘the balance of probabilities’ when determining matters which are in dispute in the consequent confiscation proceedings.

 

Contacting us

Our contact details are here.

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales.  There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this.  Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

Defence opening statements to be introduced

Two way trafficDefence opening statements are to be introduced in the Magistrates’ Court and Crown Court in England and Wales from 4 April 2016.  Changes are to be made to Rules 24.3 and 25.9 of the Criminal Procedure Rules 2015 to introduce defence opening statements, which are to be heard immediately after the prosecution opening speech, where a defendant pleads ‘not guilty’.

One of the aims of this change is to better identify for Magistrates and jurors, at an early stage, those matters which are in dispute between prosecution and defence.  They may then have this in mind when hearing the prosecution and defence evidence.

Prior to this rule change it has normally been the case that only the prosecuting counsel has made an opening speech, immediately before calling witnesses for the prosecution.  The prosecution evidence has typically been followed by the presentation of any witnesses called by the defence (usually starting with the defendant himself if he is to give evidence), then closing speeches – first by the prosecution and then by the defence.  In the Crown Court this has been followed by the judge’s summing up of the evidence and his directions on the law, before the jury retire to consider their verdict.

It could therefore be the case that it would not be until almost the conclusion of the trial that the Magistrates or jurors would hear a structured presentation of the key elements of the defence challenge to the prosecution case.

Under the new Rules it is intended that Magistrates and jurors should be enabled to have the essence of the defence in mind, focussing on what is in issue, when hearing all of the evidence.

The Rule change follows a recommendation in the Review of Efficiency in Criminal Proceedings by Sir Brian Leveson, the President of the Queen’s Bench Division of the High Court, published on 23 January 2015.

 

Contacting us

Our contact details are here.

David

(Note: This article discusses the criminal law of England and Wales.  There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s trial in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this.  Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

S10A PoCA 2002 determinations – appeals & reconsideration

Scales of justiceOnce the Crown Court has made a ‘determination’ for the purposes of confiscation of the extent of a convicted defendant’s interest in an asset can that ‘determination’ be altered on an appeal or reconsideration?

The short answer is ‘Yes’.  A previous article ‘Crown Court section 10A determinations in confiscation‘ considered the new power to make a ‘determination’ introduced by s1 Serious Crime Act 2015 which inserted new s10A into the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002.

This article goes on to consider appeal & reconsideration of s10A determinations.

 

Appeal

A s10A determination may be appealed either by the prosecutor or by a person whom the Court of Appeal thinks is or may be a person holding an interest in the asset in question, but different eligibility rules apply, see s3 SCA 2015.

Whoever wishes to appeal to the Court of Appeal will not be permitted to do so where a receiver has already been appointed under s50 PoCA 2002, or where the Court of Appeal believes that an application is to be made by the prosecutor for the appointment of a receiver, or where such an application has been made but has not yet been determined.

In addition where the intended appeal is to be made by a person who claims to hold an interest in the asset the appeal must be on the basis that either the person was not given a reasonable opportunity to make representations when the determination was made, or that giving effect to the determination would result in a serious risk of injustice to that person, or both.

But what is meant by “a serious risk of injustice”?  I would suggest that this is not restricted to a risk of serious injustice – what is serious is the risk, not the injustice.  When considering the meaning of the same phrase in earlier confiscation legislation the Court of Appeal in the case of R v Benjafield [2000] EWCA Crim 86 held, at paragraph [41.4]: “any real as opposed to a fanciful risk of injustice can be appropriately described as serious”.

It is doubtful whether an error which had an insignificant impact on the outcome would be regarded as creating an “injustice”.  However it may prove to be the case that the need to show “a serious risk of injustice” will not be an especially difficult hurdle for a potential appellant.

On hearing an appeal against a determination the Court of Appeal may confirm the determination, or make such order as it believes is appropriate.  The decision of the Court of Appeal may be further appealed to the Supreme Court.

 

Reconsideration in the Crown Court

When the Crown Court is appointing a receiver under s50 it may confer various powers upon the receiver including (but not limited to) power to manage or realise any realisable assets, and the court may may order a person holding an interest in a realisable asset to make payment to the receiver in respect of a beneficial interest in that asset held by the convicted defendant or the recipient of a tainted gift, see s51(2) & (6).

Where a s10A determination in respect of an asset has not previously been made the Crown Court must not exercise those powers without giving any person holding an interest in the asset a reasonable opportunity to make representations to it, s51(8).

Where a s10A determination in respect of an asset has previously been made that will bind the Crown Court when appointing the receiver, unless the Crown Court finds on an application by a person holding an interest in the asset that either the person was not given a reasonable opportunity to make representations when the determination was made and has not appealed against the determination, or that giving effect to the determination would result in a serious risk of injustice to that person, or both – see s51(8B) inserted by s4 SCA 2015.

The effect therefore is that the s10A determination can be undone by the Crown Court when it is appointing a receiver (unless that determination has already been subject to an appeal to the Court of Appeal).

 

The combined effect

The combined effect of these provisions is that a person with an interest in the asset will have an opportunity either to appeal to the Court of Appeal against the determination or an opportunity to ask the Crown Court to reconsider the determination (but cannot do both).

In either case the person with the interest will have to satisfy the court that either he was not given a reasonable opportunity to make representations when the determination was made, or that giving effect to the determination would result in a serious risk of injustice to him, or both.

He will need to do that on or before the appointment of a receiver under s50.

It remains the case that the powers of the receiver must be exercised with a view to allowing a person other than the defendant or a recipient of a tainted gift to retain or recover the value of any interest held by him, see s69(3)(a).

A s10A determination is a determination of the defendant’s interest in the asset rather than a determination of the interests of others but clearly has a relevance to issues arising under s69(3)(a).

 

Conclusion

The existence of these opportunities to challenge the previous ‘conclusive’ s10A determination may be thought to go a long way to nullify the perceived attractions of inviting the Crown Court to make a s10A PoCA 2002 determination when making a confiscation order.

 

Contacting us

Our contact details are here.

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales. There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this. Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

7 key differences between trial & confiscation

Legal booksIn many respects confiscation proceedings exist in a different world from criminal trials.  It is almost as if, like Lewis Carroll’s Alice, we have stepped through a looking glass into a parallel universe.

It is important that lawyers recognise this and adjust their approach to the work accordingly.  This article points up, briefly and in the most general terms, seven key differences between Crown Court trials and confiscation proceedings.

 

1 The question

In a Crown Court trial the key issue is whether the defendant is ‘Guilty‘ or ‘Not Guilty‘ of the offence or offences of which he is charged.

In confiscation proceedings the question is ‘How much?.  The proceedings are concerned primarily with the quantification, in money terms, of the convicted defendant’s ‘benefit‘ and ‘available amount‘ (as defined in Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002).

 

2 The standard & burden of proof

In the trial the burden of proof rests upon the prosecution to the ‘criminal standard’.  They have to make the jury ‘sure’ of the guilt of the defendant.

In confiscation proceedings the standard of proof is the ‘civil standard’ – the balance of probabilities – and, in many respects, the burden of proof is on the convicted defendant; particularly in rebutting the statutory s10 assumptions in a ‘criminal lifestyle‘ case and in satisfying the court that the convicted defendant’s ‘available amount‘ is less than his ‘benefit‘.

 

3 The focus & scope of the proceedings

In the trial the focus is on the offence or offences of which the defendant is charged.  In confiscation proceedings the focus is on the convicted defendant under consideration.

Where, as is often the case, in confiscation proceedings the convicted defendant is alleged to have a ‘criminal lifestylethe scope of the proceedings can range far beyond matters relevant to the offence or offences of which he has been convicted.  The entire financial affairs of the convicted defendant over a period of many years may be subject to scrutiny.

Consideration of the convicted defendant’s ‘available amount‘ involves matters unconnected with any offence.

The indictment in a criminal trial may cover a number of co-defendants, but the s16 statement in confiscation proceedings deals only with a single convicted defendant.  A confiscation order reflects the ‘benefit‘ obtained, solely or jointly, and the ‘available amount‘ of only that particular convicted defendant.

 

4 The evidence

In a criminal trial the prosecution may call a number of witnesses who may have, quite literally, witnessed the alleged crime being committed.  The defence may call evidence from the defendant himself.

In confiscation proceedings the prosecution are unlikely to call evidence from anyone other than the financial investigator who is the author of the s16 statement (which sets out the prosecution assertions regarding the convicted defendant’s ‘benefit‘ and ‘available amount‘).  The likelihood is that little or no weight will be given by the court to unsupported oral evidence from the convicted defendant since, by that stage, he has been found guilty and his credibility thereby undermined.

The defence will therefore seek to present other witnesses, perhaps including a forensic accountant expert witness, and documentary evidence in support of the defence assertions.

Evidence which would be inadmissible in the criminal trial may be admissible in confiscation proceedings.

 

5 The decision makers

In a Crown Court trial the key decision of ‘Guilty’ or ‘Not Guilty’ is made by the jury, then in the case of a ‘Guilty’ verdict the sentencing is carried out by the judge.

But in confiscation proceedings there is no jury.  All the decisions are made by the Crown Court judge.  Having said that, in many cases the figures of ‘benefit‘ and ‘available amount‘ are in practice settled by negotiation resulting in an agreement between counsel for prosecution and defence which has been reached outside the courtroom.  The judge will then be invited to make an order in the agreed figures and fix a default sentence.

 

6 The factors in sentencing

In relation to sentencing following trial key factors will often include the nature and gravity of the conduct of the defendant in committing the offence, whether he pleaded guilty, his previous convictions, and his conduct since the offence in terms of showing remorse or making reparation.

In contrast a confiscation order is not strictly speaking regarded as punishment for the offence at all.  So those factors (other than reparation) will have no impact on the confiscation.  A relatively minor offence (in terms of sentencing) might be followed by a very substantial confiscation order, whilst conviction for a relatively serious offence might be followed by a minimal confiscation order.

By way of example, in the case of Waya [2012] UKSC 51 the mortgage fraud offence attracted 80 hours community punishment but the eventual confiscation order was in the very substantial sum of £392,400.

It has been said that confiscation is intended, not to punish the convicted defendant for the crime, but to deprive him of the benefit he has obtained from relevant criminal conduct, up to the limit of his available means.

 

7 Appeals

The prosecution have, with very limited exceptions, no opportunity to appeal the verdict or sentence in a criminal trial.

However prosecution and defence are each permitted to appeal a confiscation order (or a decision to make no confiscation order).

 

Conclusions

Confiscation proceedings are very different from the criminal trial which precedes them. They demand a different approach from instructed lawyers and an extensive examination of financial evidence.  That examination may be assisted by the work of a forensic accountant, particularly where it is alleged that the convicted defendant has a ‘criminal lifestyle‘.

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales.  There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this.  Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

Confiscation – the basics

photo 123 - copyright David Winch 2014This post aims to be an introduction to the basics of confiscation under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England & Wales.  It includes links to more detailed articles dealing with particular elements of confiscation law (shown like this).

A word of warning.  An introduction like this can be broadly correct but cannot cover the full detail of the legislation nor can it cover those unusual circumstances which may be exceptions to the general guidance contained here.

Be warned too that words and phrases used in confiscation often have a specific technical meaning which is not the same as their meaning in everyday English conversation.  That applies particularly to terms such as ‘benefit’, ‘criminal lifestyle’ and ‘available amount’.

 

When does confiscation apply?

Confiscation proceedings can only be commenced when a defendant has been convicted (either in the Crown Court or Magistrates’ Court) of one or more offences from which he has obtained a benefit.  All confiscation proceedings in England & Wales are conducted in the Crown Court in front of a judge but without a jury.

A wide range of offences can form the basis for confiscation proceedings, including offences such as theft, fraud, drugs offences, money laundering and tax evasion. However confiscation orders are not imposed in every case in which a defendant obtains a benefit. In the year to 31 March 2013 approximately 673,000 persons were convicted of an offence (not all of which involved any benefit being obtained) but only 6,392 confiscation orders were imposed.

Confiscation proceedings are initiated by the prosecution.  There are no published criteria specifying when confiscation proceedings will be initiated.  Where the defendant has obtained a benefit from an offence of which he has been convicted and the prosecution ask for confiscation proceedings to be initiated the court has no discretion to refuse.

The legislation is intended to deprive defendants of the benefit they have gained from relevant criminal conduct, whether or not they have retained such benefit, within the limits of their available means.  The benefit gained is the total value of the property or advantage obtained, not the defendant’s net profit after deduction of expenses.

 

The court procedure

Whilst the judge can make a confiscation order at the time of sentencing a convicted defendant, in many cases the judge will at that time simply set a timetable for further steps towards confiscation.

This normally involves firstly a requirement for the defendant to supply detailed information about his financial affairs; secondly the prosecution to provide a report identifying the amount of benefit said to have been obtained by the defendant and (usually) identifying his ‘available amount‘ (this is referred to as the s16 statement); thirdly the defendant is required to respond to the prosecution’s report indicating the extent to which he agrees and disagrees with it; and finally there will be a hearing scheduled which will culminate in the making of the confiscation order.

In practice the initial timetable may be revised if difficulties or delays arise so these steps may take months, or even years, to complete.

Evidence which would be inadmissible at trial may be admitted in confiscation proceedings.

 

The three decisions

Assuming that the defendant has obtained a benefit from an offence of which he has been convicted, the court then has three key decisions to make.

  • Firstly what benefit has the defendant obtained from the offence or offences of which he has been convicted (including any other offences ‘taken into consideration’ when sentencing)?
  • Secondly, if the defendant has a ‘criminal lifestyle‘, what benefit is he to be assumed to have obtained in addition to the benefit obtained from the offence or offences of which he has been convicted?
  • Thirdly what is his ‘available amount‘?

In confiscation proceedings the burden of proof generally rests upon the defendant rather than the prosecutor – particularly in rebutting the statutory assumptions where the defendant has a ‘criminal lifestyle‘ and in satisfying the court that the defendant has an ‘available amount‘ which is less than his ‘benefit’.  In each case the court will make its decision on the basis of the ‘balance of probabilities’, see s6(7) PoCA 2002.

 

Benefit obtained from the offence

The legal position is that a person obtains a benefit from criminal conduct if he obtains ‘property’ (which means an asset of any description) or a pecuniary advantage as a result of or in connection with that criminal conduct, see s76 PoCA 2002.

Sometimes the benefit obtained from the offence is quite obvious.  If I steal £10,000 from your bank account I have obviously obtained a benefit of £10,000.

But in many cases the benefit obtained will be less obvious.  For example if John is a member of a group of people and is convicted of conspiracy to supply controlled drugs there may be a number of issues arising concerning the extent of John’s involvement in the conspiracy and the valuation of the drugs.  If Peter has obtained a mortgage advance dishonestly his benefit will be a proportion of the increase in value of the property since he purchased it.

However the courts will always be looking to the benefit “obtained” – not the benefit “retained”.  Where the court is satisfied that a particular benefit has been obtained jointly by more than one person it will treat each person as having obtained the whole of that benefit – but will place a cap on the overall recovery of jointly obtained benefit from the different defendants.

 

Assumed benefit of criminal lifestyle

In many cases the defendant will be held to have a ‘criminal lifestyle‘ and this will trigger the statutory assumptions set out in s10 PoCA 2002.  The effect may be to increase very substantially the defendant’s total alleged benefit.

These assumptions relate to the defendant’s receipts and payments since the ‘relevant day’ (normally the day six years before the day on which he was charged with the offence) up to the day on which the court makes the confiscation order (but in practice the assumptions are usually applied only up to an earlier date for convenience) and the defendant’s assets held at any time after the date of his conviction (whenever they were first obtained).

A defendant has a ‘criminal lifestyle‘ if the criteria set out in s75 are satisfied, but not otherwise.  The criteria relate to the offence or offences of which the defendant has been convicted – they do not relate to his ‘lifestyle’ in the everyday sense of that word.

It is in ‘criminal lifestyle‘ cases in which the services of a forensic accountant may prove particularly valuable in challenging the prosecutor’s s16 statement.

There is an obvious danger of excessive benefit figures and double counting where the ‘criminal lifestyle‘ assumptions are made.

 

The defendant’s available amount

The defendant’s ‘available amount‘ includes all his assets currently held (with a deduction for liabilities secured on those assets) and the current value of any ‘tainted gifts’ he has made, see s9 and s81 PoCA 2002.

The court will not consider, for the purpose of determining the defendant’s ‘available amount‘, whether those assets which he currently holds were obtained legitimately or not – that does not matter at this stage.

 

The confiscation order

In order to reach its decisions the court may hold a hearing at which oral and written evidence from both sides will be presented.

However in many confiscation cases the prosecution and defence will negotiate agreed figures for ‘benefit’ and ‘available amount‘ prior to the scheduled hearing of oral evidence.  In that event there will be only a brief hearing before the judge at which he will be invited to approve the agreed figures which then become the basis for the confiscation order.

Before finalising the order the court may need to consider whether the application of the statutory assumptions has created a serious risk of injustice and whether the proposed order would be disproportionate and infringe the defendant’s human rights.

Only very rarely will the amount of the confiscation order be limited to the profit arising from the criminal conduct.

The court will normally order the defendant to pay, within a specified period of time, a sum of money equal to the lower of (a) his total benefit and (b) his available amount.

If the court has no information from which it is able to conclude on the balance of probabilities that the defendant has an ‘available amount‘ which is less than his total ‘benefit’ it will make a confiscation order in the amount of the ‘benefit’.

Where the court accepts that the defendant’s ‘available amount‘ is less than his total ‘benefit’ a brief list of the assets which form the defendant’s ‘available amount‘ should be appended to the confiscation order issued by the court.

The court will typically allow up to six months for payment (from 1 June 2015 this is limited to three months as a result of amendments to confiscation law).  The court will also set a default sentence, which is a period of imprisonment the defendant may be required to serve if he does not pay the required sum.

The defendant may subsequently return to court to ask for a six month extension to the time to pay, making a maximum of 12 months in all from the date of the confiscation order (from 1 June 2015 this is limited to a further three months making six months in all from the date of the confiscation order).

Interest is charged on any amount which remains outstanding after the due date for payment, s12.

 

Appeals

Either prosecution or defence may appeal against the confiscation order.  Appeal is to the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) and ultimately to the Supreme Court.  An appeal ought to be initiated within 28 days of the confiscation order but late appeals may be heard in some circumstances.

 

Subsequent events

Where a confiscation order has been made in the amount of the defendant’s ‘available amount‘ and subsequent realisation of his assets identified in the confiscation order produces a lesser amount than anticipated, the defendant (or the prosecution) can apply to the court under s23 to have the amount of the defendant’s confiscation order reduced to reflect his revised ‘available amount‘ based on the actual amounts realised.

Where evidence comes to light which was not available to the prosecution at the time of the confiscation hearing which indicates that the defendant’s benefit was greater than that found by the court at that hearing the prosecution can, within 6 years of the date of conviction, apply to the court for the benefit figure to be increased under s20 or s21.

Where a confiscation order has been made in the amount of the defendant’s ‘available amount‘ (which was less than his benefit) the prosecution can apply to the court, at any time, for an order under s22 requiring the defendant to pay a further amount where he has a current ‘available amount‘ which would enable him to satisfy a new order – but he may not be required to pay an amount more than the court believes to be just.  In that sense a confiscation order may be regarded as a ‘life sentence’.

Where only a small balance remains outstanding on a confiscation order the court may discharge the order under s24 or  s25.

Where, following a fresh conviction on a subsequent occasion, a defendant finds himself subject to confiscation proceedings a second time the usual rules may be modified on the second time around.

 

Other confiscation topics

Other confiscation topics, such as restraint orders, the impact of bankruptcy on confiscation and adjustments for changes in the value of money are covered in further articles in this blog.  A full list of confiscation articles is here.

 

Contacting us

Our contact details are here.

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales.  There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this.  Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

Supreme Court caps confiscation enforcement

Supreme Court logoThe UK Supreme Court has capped confiscation enforcement in cases where more than one confiscation order covers the same joint benefit.  The result is that the State will be unable to recover in excess of 100% of the benefit jointly obtained.  It is as if the confiscation order created a joint and several liability of the defendant to ‘repay’ the benefit jointly obtained.

The principle is simple – but the practical implications may on occasion be complex.

In fact the Supreme Court judgment on 18 June 2014 in the cases of R v Ahmad & Ahmed and R v Fields & Others [2014] UKSC 36 dealt with another point too – confirming that under the law of confiscation if two or more persons obtain a benefit jointly they each obtain the whole of it.  That point is considered in a separate blog article.

 

The problem

The problem may best be understood by a simple example.  Suppose John and Jim get a couple of guns, walk into a bank together and rob it of £10,000.  Subsequently they are caught and convicted and are made subject to confiscation orders.  In those confiscation orders each of John and Jim will have a benefit of £10,000.  Assuming each of them has sufficient assets it seems that in total they will be required to ‘repay’ £20,000 into court.  So, it appears, the court will recover twice the amount stolen.

The Supreme Court concluded that that could not be right.  Recovering double the amount stolen would be disproportionate.  It would not serve the real aims of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 and it would be a violation of the defendants’ rights under Article 1 of the First Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights.

 

The simple answer

The simple answer is to require each of the confiscation orders against John and Jim to provide that it is not to be enforced to the extent that a sum has been recovered by way of satisfaction of another confiscation order made in relation to the same joint benefit.

This is what the Supreme Court held in its judgment at para [74].

So if the court recovers £5,000 from John it will only recover a further £5,000 from Jim.  Of course that means if the court recovers £10,000 from John then it will recover nothing from Jim, but the Supreme Court said that criminals have to accept that risk of unfairness.

 

Potential complications

Although the principle is clear and the reason for it is straightforward, its application in practice may be more complicated.

Suppose that as well as John and Jim robbing the bank there was a getaway driver, Jack.  Let’s suppose Jack was not caught at the time, but a good while later he is caught and convicted.  If he is subject to confiscation then presumably he cannot be liable to pay anything if the court has already received £10,000 from John and Jim.  So that is a bit of luck for Jack!

Let’s consider some other defendants.  Peter and Phil are fraudsters operating a fake business in which they order goods on credit, sell them and disappear – pocketing the money and never paying their suppliers.  Peter and Phil had a joint bank account for the fake business which received £50,000 from customers over a period of just under one year.

Peter and Phil are caught, convicted of fraudulent trading contrary to s9 Fraud Act 2006 and subject to confiscation.  In the confiscation proceedings each of them has a ‘criminal lifestyle‘ having been convicted of an offence carried on for at least 6 months from which a benefit of at least £5,000 has been obtained, s75 PoCA 2002.

Peter and Phil each have a benefit of £50,000 from the offence of which they have been convicted.  But that is not the end of the story.

The separate personal bank accounts which Peter and Phil have are examined and the statutory criminal lifestyle assumptions are applied.  There are £70,000 unexplained credits in Peter’s bank account and £25,000 unexplained credits in Phil’s bank account.  In consequence the court finds Peter’s total benefit for confiscation purposes to be £120,000 and Phil’s total benefit to be £75,000.

Peter’s available amount is £80,000 and Phil’s is £45,000.  So the court makes confiscation orders against Peter for £80,000 and against Phil for £45,000.

If Peter pays the £80,000 and Phil pays nothing, can enforcement proceedings still be taken against Phil?  If they can, how much can be enforced against Phil?  I do not think the Supreme Court judgment helps me answer these questions because I need to know how much of the £80,000 recovered from Peter relates to the £50,000 benefit jointly obtained and how much of it relates to the other £70,000 assumed benefit of Peter’s.

For example if the £80,000 recovered from Peter includes all the £50,000 jointly obtained benefit of the fraud then the most that can be enforced against Phil is his additional assumed benefit of £25,000.

But, at the other extreme, if the £80,000 recovered from Peter comprises £70,000 re his additional assumed benefit and only £10,000 re the jointly obtained benefit then it would appear that the whole £45,000 can be enforced against Phil (because he still has unrecovered amounts of £40,000 joint benefit and £25,000 additional assumed benefit).

Looking at this another way, if we make a presumption that in each case the first £50,000 of the amounts ordered to be paid by Peter and Phil related specifically to the jointly obtained benefit then the £80,000 paid by Peter has repaid all of the jointly obtained benefit and so (arguably) there can be no enforcement action against Phil.  But that would seem to be a nonsensical outcome.

 

Default sentences

We also need to consider the implications for default sentences.

Going back to John and Jim.  They each had a benefit of £10,000 from the bank robbery.  Let’s assume the confiscation orders against each of them specified a default sentence of 6 months.  If the court recovers £5,000 from John – so it can then only enforce a maximum of £5,000 against Jim – does that result in a corresponding reduction in Jim’s default sentence if he fails to pay?

My guess is that Jim will indeed have his default sentence effectively reduced.  But the Supreme Court judgment does not provide the answer.

Presumably Jack, the getaway driver, cannot be made to serve any default sentence if the court has already recovered the £10,000 from John and Jim.  And what about Phil the fraudster – what is the position regarding his default sentence?

 

In conclusion

It seems to me that in solving one problem the Supreme Court have risked creating further problems in relation to the enforcement of confiscation orders.

If it were decided that any ambiguity should be resolved in favour of the defendants then (i) all recoveries from any defendant should be applied against his benefit jointly obtained in priority to his other benefit, and (ii) each defendant’s default sentence ought to be reduced pro-rata when the amount enforceable against him reduces (whether this arises as a result of a recovery from him or as a result of a recovery from another person relating to benefit obtained jointly with him).

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales. There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this. Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

UK Supreme Court rules on benefit obtained jointly

Supreme Court logoThe UK Supreme Court has finally and firmly ruled out apportionment of benefit obtained jointly in its judgment on 18 June 2014 in the cases of R v Ahmad & Ahmed and R v Fields & Others [2014] UKSC 36.

The Supreme Court confirmed that where benefit is jointly obtained by more than one defendant then each defendant obtains the whole of the benefit obtained jointly, for the purpose of confiscation proceedings.

 

Benefit “obtained”

Benefit arises where a person “obtains” an asset or evades a liability as a result of or in connection with criminal conduct, see s76 Proceeds of Crime Act 2002.  But the Supreme Court points out, in para [42] of Ahmad, whilst a criminal may sometimes become the owner of property obtained through crime, in many cases he does not do so.  When a person “obtains” a chattel, money, a credit balance or land through criminal dishonesty, he does not acquire title to, or ownership of, the item in question, although he does acquire control over it.

As was pointed out by Lord Walker and Hughes LJ in Waya [2012] UKSC 51, para [68], a person who dishonestly obtains property has “at most a possessory interest good against third parties, and thus of no significant value”.

 

Contrasting “obtaining” and “ownership”

The Supreme Court considered that cases under the 2002 Act involve “obtaining” not “ownership”, and, even if they did involve ownership, the Court were doubtful whether that ownership would be technically joint, para [55].

In paras [60] to [62] of Ahmad the Supreme Court set out their thinking in rejecting arguments for apportionment of benefit.  The argument for apportioned valuation is that s79(3) requires the valuation of the property obtained to take into account the interests of accomplices.  This argument misunderstands the purpose and effect of s79(3) said the Supreme Court.  A defendant who steals property or obtains it by deception does not acquire ownership of that property.  Likewise if two defendants jointly misappropriate property, neither of them obtains a legal interest in it and neither has an “interest” for the purpose of s79(3).  In relation to each of them, the value obtained is the value of what they have taken, which is the market value of the misappropriated property.  Thus, once a defendant has obtained the property, whether solely or jointly, that market value is the value of what he has obtained.

The “interests” of a defendant’s co-conspirators are not to be taken into account when valuing the property for the purpose of assessing the value of the property which the defendant “obtained”.  Furthermore when one is valuing the property which a conspirator, including a defendant, has “obtained”, one is not normally valuing an “interest” at all.

 

Whether benefit was obtained jointly

However the Supreme Court also confirmed, by references at paras [41] and [46] to [51], that Crown Courts should not be too quick to conclude that benefit has been jointly obtained when there is evidence which suggests that it may not have been.  Judges in confiscation proceedings, said the Supreme Court, should be ready to investigate and make findings as to whether there were separate obtainings.

David

P. S.  A separate blog article “Supreme Court caps confiscation enforcement” deals with the cap on enforcement of confiscation orders which was also dealt with in the UK Supreme Court judgment in R v Ahmad & Ahmed and R v Fields & Others [2014] UKSC 36.

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales. There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this. Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)

Confiscation – challenging the prosecutor’s s16 statement

Legal wig copyright David Winch 2014How should the defence challenge the prosecutor’s assertions concerning the defendant’s benefit and available amount?

The prosecutor’s s16 Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 statement is a key document in confiscation proceedings.  In preparing the s16 statement the prosecution will have considered the offence(s) of which the defendant has been convicted; the evidence at trial (or readied for trial where there has been a guilty plea) and other information collected during investigation of the offence; information provided by the defendant in any statement under s18 or in response to any requirement in a restraint order under s41(7); information obtained from banks and others (perhaps by way of a production order under s345); and the results of the prosecution’s own investigations – probably undertaken by an accredited financial investigator.

 

Variety

Prosecution s16 statements are prepared in a wide variety of circumstances.  No two s16 statements will be the same – though they all have some similarities.  In any event the s16 statement will need careful study.  Typically the body of the s16 statement will run to between 10 and 30 pages with supporting appendices which could run to several hundred pages, and may include spreadsheets.

The s16 statement is likely to include some background narrative which sets the confiscation proceedings into context, including a description of the court proceedings resulting in the conviction and any restraint order which has been obtained.   There may also be information about the defendant (date of birth, previous convictions, etc) and information about his known legitimate income.

The defence legal team will wish to challenge any incorrect factual assertions in that narrative – but this narrative background is not at the heart of the s16 statement.

 

Financial investigations and ‘benefit’

The s16 statement will then move on, probably providing some details about the financial investigations undertaken by the prosecution and their findings about the defendant’s financial affairs.  That leads to the prosecution assertions about the defendant’s ‘benefit’ for confiscation purposes.

In this context ‘benefit’ has a special meaning based on the statutory provisions – it does not refer to what might be the defendant’s benefit in the everyday sense of the word.

 

‘Benefit’ of the offences

The first element of the defendant’s ‘benefit’ which the s16 statement will deal with is the ‘benefit’ of the offences of which the defendant has been convicted, sometimes referred to as the ‘direct benefit’ or the ‘benefit of particular criminal conduct’.  Here the prosecution are considering what the defendant ‘obtained’ as a result of the offences of which he has been convicted in the proceedings which triggered the confiscation.

This may be very easy to establish.  If the defendant has been convicted of, say, stealing a cheque for £10,000 payable to someone else and paying it into his own bank account then the ‘benefit’ of that offence is £10,000 (possibly uplifted for changes in the Retail Prices Index since the date of the theft).

But in many cases the ‘benefit’ of the offence will be less clear cut.  For example there may be theft of cash where there are inadequate records to quantity the amount of cash stolen, or supply of controlled drugs where there are no records of the monies received for the drugs, or the defendant may have been a member of a conspiracy (meaning it will be necessary to ascertain the amount ‘obtained’ by this particular defendant in his role in that conspiracy).

In rare cases the ‘benefit’ may be based on the profit deriving from fundamentally legitimate business operations which have been tainted by criminality, as in the case of R v Sale.

The ‘benefit’ asserted by the prosecution may also include assets which need to be valued, such as controlled drugs seized at the time of the defendant’s arrest.

In other cases the ‘benefit’ may be based on a ‘pecuniary advantage’ arising from the evasion of a liability – for example evasion of income tax, VAT or duties on goods.

In a minority of cases the prosecution may not be asserting that the defendant has obtained any benefit at all from the offences of which he has been convicted.

 

Assumed ‘benefit’

If the prosecution assert that the defendant has a ‘criminal lifestyle’ then the s16 statement will also deal with additional assumed ‘benefit’ which arises under the statutory assumptions of s10 PoCA 2002.  The statutory assumptions apply to the defendant’s receipts and expenditures since the ‘relevant day’ (which is usually 6 years prior to the date on which the defendant was charged with the offences of which he has been convicted) and to any assets held by the defendant since the date of his conviction.

Typically the prosecution will have obtained bank and credit card statements for all known bank and credit card accounts held by the defendant and will have reviewed all deposits to those accounts since the ‘relevant day’.  They may also have information about the defendant’s expenditures since the ‘relevant day’ – for example as a result of examining documents seized from searches of the defendant’s premises or considering information provided by the defendant in recorded interviews or in his s18 statement.  In addition the prosecution may have obtained Land Registry records or solicitors’ conveyancing files regarding property purchases, and mortgage account statements.

These same sources of information may be the basis for assertions of assumed ‘benefit’ in respect of any assets held by the defendant after the date of his conviction.

 

‘Available amount’

Finally the prosecutor’s s16 statement will deal with the defendant’s ‘available amount’.  Again this is a term defined by statute which does not mean simply the amount which the defendant has available to meet the confiscation order.  It refers to the current market value of the defendant’s assets, less any mortgage or other liability which is secured on those assets, plus the current value of any ‘tainted gift’ which the defendant has made.

However many of the defendant’s liabilities, such as unsecured borrowings and unpaid bills, will be ignored when computing the defendant’s ‘available amount’.

 

Default sentence

The s16 statement may conclude with an indication of the range of default sentences applicable where a confiscation order remains unpaid.

 

Challenging the s16 statement

The defence will wish to scrutinise in detail the prosecution assertions in relation to both the defendant’s ‘benefit’ and his ‘available amount’.  The focus of the defence challenge to the prosecutor’s figures will depend very much on the details within the s16 statement.

In relation to the ‘benefit’ of the offences of which the defendant has been convicted the defence will wish to consider the existence of the asserted ‘benefit’; whether it has been ‘obtained’ by the defendant himself, solely or jointly; and whether it is correctly valued.

Regarding the assumed ‘benefit’ the defence will wish to consider whether the criteria for a ‘criminal lifestyle’ have been met; whether the ‘relevant day’ has been correctly identified; the existence of the asserted receipts, expenditures and assets of the defendant himself (which may involve careful consideration of bank accounts and assets held in joint names and consideration of ‘lifting the corporate veil’); any evidence of the legitimate nature of those receipts and legitimate funds used to finance those expenditures and the purchase of those assets; any overlap or double counting between the various heads of asserted ‘benefit’ including, for example, where monies have been withdrawn from one of the defendant’s bank accounts and paid in to another; and the valuation of the various items reflected in the assumed ‘benefit’.

In relation to the asserted ‘available amount’ the defence will again consider the existence of those assets; the ownership of them by the defendant himself so as to exclude any interest of third parties; the current market value of those assets; and the amount of any liabilities secured on those assets.

Particular difficulties may arise where the ‘available amount’ is said to include any ‘tainted gifts’ or ‘hidden assets’.

Ultimately the defence will also wish to consider whether the use of the statutory assumptions involves a ‘serious risk of injustice’ or the confiscation order sought by the prosecution would be disproportionate and so infringe the defendant’s human rights.

All of these matters will feed in to the drafting of a s17 statement to be signed by the defendant and filed in response to the prosecution’s s16 statement, and the defence preparation for the confiscation hearing in the Crown Court.

 

Use of a forensic accountant

A forensic accountant may be able to assist the defence in challenging a number of aspects of the s16 statement.  This is likely to be particularly important in cases involving ‘assumed benefit’ under the ‘criminal lifestyle’ assumptions.  A forensic accountant may be better placed than the solicitor to undertake detailed examination of the figures and financial documents underlying the prosecution’s s16 assertions.

The cost of a forensic accountant’s report will normally be met by criminal legal aid under prior authority arrangements.

As a first step it is advisable to ask the forensic accountant to provide a fee quotation (to be forwarded to the Legal Aid Agency with an application for prior authority).  In order to prepare his quotation the forensic accountant should ideally be provided with a copy of the body of the prosecutor’s s16 statement, an approximate page count of the appendices to that statement, a copy of the defendant’s s18 statement, any advice which may have been obtained from counsel in relation to the s16 statement, and a note of the court timetable for the submission of the defendant’s response in the form of a s17 statement.

Where the appendices to the s16 statement include spreadsheets it is usual to ask the prosecution to supply electronic copies of the Excel spreadsheets (not the PDFs) either on disc or as email attachments.

Once the prior authority has been obtained the forensic accountant’s work can get underway!

David

(Note: This article applies to confiscation proceedings under the provisions of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in England and Wales. There are a number of additional issues which could be relevant to a defendant’s confiscation proceedings in particular cases which it is not possible to deal with in a relatively short article such as this. Appropriate professional advice should be sought in each individual case.)